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August 25, 2015

Pet Info when Buying Las Vegas Real Estate.

I have seen a few questions regarding pet ownership in Las Vegas / Clark County so I thought I would service those questions with a basic summary of the regulations and issues in Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding areas. Since my wife and I foster dogs, we have a special interest in the rules.

First let’s summarize the county and municipalities regulations:

Clark County

For clarity, you would fall under the jurisdiction if you do not live within an incorporated city. When you live in a city, the city’s regulations will take precedence. For those people relocating here you may not know, but much of what people think of as “Las Vegas” is actually in Clark County and not in the city of Las Vegas!

Licensing.
There is no licensing in Clark County! But all dogs, cats and ferrets within the unincorporated area of Clark County are required to have the following forms of identification: Microchip Device, Current Owner Identification Tag or Rabies Tag.

Vaccinations: All dogs, cats and ferrets within the unincorporated area of Clark County are required to be vaccinated for rabies.

Number of Pets Allowed. No more than three dogs and three cats (over the age of 3 months) are allowed at one residence without a Pet Fancier’s permit. I could not find any regulation on how many ferrets you can have, however!

For a Pet Fancier’s Permit, Contact Clark County Animal Control at (702) 455-7710. The permits cost $50 and must be renewed annually. The permit allows up to six dogs, one year of age or more, or 10 cats, 8-months-of-age or older.

Sterilization / Spay / Neuter. All dogs and cats over four months old must be sterilized unless the owner has an exemption (Call Animal Control for exemptions).

City of Las Vegas

Licensing: All dogs, cats and ferrets over the age of four months.

Vaccinations: Requires rabies vaccinations for dogs, cats and ferrets within 30 days after reaching three months of age.

Number of Pets Allowed.
No more than three dogs and three cats (over the age of 3 months) are allowed at one residence without a Pet Fancier’s permit. No more than three ferrets over four months old are allowed.

A dog fancier may keep and maintain on his property a maximum of six adult dogs. Permits cost $50 and must be renewed annually.

A cat fancier may keep and maintain on his property a maximum of six adult cats (ahchoooo!). Permits cost $50 and must be renewed annually.

A pet fancier may own, keep or possess on his or her property not more than six dogs over one year of age or twelve cats(double achoooo!) over eight months of age, or any combination thereof if the number of dogs does not exceed six and the combined number of animals does not exceed twelve. Permits cost $50 and must be renewed annually. For additional info/requirements call Animal Control, (702) 229-6444.

Sterilization / Spay / Neuter. All dogs and cats over four months old must be sterilized unless the owner has an exemption (Call Animal Control for exemptions).

City of North Las Vegas

Licensing: All dogs and cats over the age of three months. Pot-bellied pigs after four months.

Vaccinations: Requires rabies vaccinations for dogs, cats and ferrets within 30 days after reaching three months of age.

Number of Pets Allowed. A maximum of three dogs, three cats, and three ferrets are allowed at any one location or residence. Up to two Pot-bellied pigs are allowed but there are numerous restrictions!

Pet fancier permits are a bit restrictive. Dog Fanciers permit allows up to six dogs. But only for the purpose of showing them in recognized dog shows, obedience or fields trials, for working or hunting, or for improving the variety of breed for exhibition is shows or trials. There are other restrictions. The Cat Fanciers permit has similar requirements and also allows up to six cats. Either permit is $25/year.

Sterilization / Spay / Neuter. All dogs and cats must be sterilized unless the owner has an exemption (Call Animal Control for exemptions). Oddly, the code does not say by what age the animals must be sterilized. However, you must show proof of sterilization when you license your pet–so at most three months old!

City of Henderson

Licensing: All dogs, cats and ferrets within 30 days after attaining three months of age.

Vaccinations: Requires rabies vaccinations for dogs, cats and ferrets within 30 days after reaching three months of age.

Number of Pets Allowed.
No more than three dogs and three cats and three ferrets (over the age of 3 months) are allowed at one residence without a Pet Fancier’s permit.

Pet Fancier’s permit allows for up to five adult spayed/neutered dogs and or cats over the age of three months. A Breeder’s permit is another option allowing for unaltered pets. Personal editorial: We have enough unwanted animals as it is! Get your pets from a shelter.

Sterilization / Spay / Neuter. All dogs and cats over four months old must be sterilized unless the owner has an exemption. But please note you must license your pet just before that time and show proof of sterilization. The sterilization regulation is a bit at odds with the licensing regulation as you can see.

Boulder City

Licensing: Dogs, cats, ferrets, wolf hybrids, and miniature Pot-Bellied Pigs within 30 days after attaining four months of age.

Vaccinations: Requires rabies vaccinations for dogs, cats and ferrets within 30 days after reaching four months of age.

Number of Pets Allowed.
No more than three animals of any permitted type (over the age of 4 months) are allowed at one residence. Period, end of story, THREE.

Sterilization / Spay / Neuter. This is the odd one out. There is no mandatory spay/neuter law in Boulder City. If you adopt from a Boulder City shelter, then sterilization is required (of your pet, not you!).

Of course, all municipalities have additional regulations regarding, barking, nuisance, cleanliness, roaming, leash laws. etc.

Okay, let’s outline some other issues:

Dangerous Breeds

pit bull faceA few folks have asked if a certain breed is restricted. On Oct 1, 2013 Nevada become one of just over a dozen states to prohibit breed-specific legislation. However, the State and many municipalities have codes regarding “dangerous dogs” regardless of breed. If a dog is deemed to be dangerous, it can be further regulated. This usually comes to play after a dog has injured another animal or person.
Although there isn’t any breed-specific regulations regarding breeds, HOAs, and Homeowner’s/Renter’s Insurance and Landlords could affect your enjoyment of certain breeds. Keep reading.

Now let’s talk about HOAs.

Your HOA may be more restrictive than the laws above. There can be limits on:

Number of pets. Breeds allowed. Weight Limits. Cleanliness. Noise. And the catch-all; Just about anything.

How to protect yourself?

When Buying

1. Get the HOA documents (CC&Rs/Rules and Regulations/Latest Board Meeting Minutes if possible) as soon as possible after getting your offer accepted. There are regulations on this and the Seller must provide these documents to you: Your offer is contingent on receiving and approving those documents.

2. Read the documents thoroughly. If there is something in there about pets that you don’t understand, contact your Realtor or the HOA directly and ask.

3. Check for: A. How many pets in total are allowed. B. Is there a weight limit. C. Are there restrictions on certain breeds. D. Barking/Nuisance rules and remedies.

For Renters:

1. Before signing the lease agreement, get a copy of the HOA documents too even though you don’t own the home. As a tenant you are responsible to follow the rules and regulations. Many leases will assign the responsibility of paying any fines onto you.

One thing to note; You may go into a new home community and see dog walks and fully-stocked poop-bag dispensers making it look dog-friendly. The HOA rules can still be very restrictive. And when all of the new homes are sold out, “coincidentally”, the poop-bags never seem to get re-stocked.

See also my blog here: http://fe9abaa.activerain.com/post/345068/dogs-are-people-too for more about HOAs and pets.

Insurance

Some homeowner’s and renter’s insurance policies will deny you coverage if you have certain “dangerous” dog breeds. And according to Felix Boston of Farmer’s Insurance, “One company will automatically deny you insurance if on your application you answer ‘yes’ to ‘has your dog ever bitten anyone?’ “

Renting and Landlords

Many rentals won’t allow pets but there are plenty that do. Those that do usually require an extra security deposit and sometimes one for each pet. $350 extra is typical. Sometimes it is refundable and often it isn’t.

Before even looking at a rental ask your agent (me!) or the property manager/landlord, what are the pet restrictions? Many will say “up to landlord’s discretion” on what pets they will accept. This means you provide details (and sometimes pictures) about your pets on the application. Then the landlord says yay or nay. By the way, most landlords won’t allow “dangerous” breeds to be in their properties even if there are no regulations against it due to liability or insurance risks. Lastly, some landlords won’t allow aquariums either for fear of water damage should the aquarium break.

Any questions or comments? Need a pet-friendly place? Contact us

Information believed to be correct and partially sourced from third-party websites. John Brassner and Belltree LLC is not liable for errors or omissions. Please check with the appropriate licensing entities and communities/HOAs before acting on any information provided herein.

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